Toshiba Security Centre

Your guide to staying safe online

Today's Threats

The internet has opened up a world of possibilities for everyone. And to make the most of it, it’s important to keep your identity safe, and your PC secure. That’s why we’ve created The Security Centre – the comprehensive guide to staying on-guard while you’re having fun online. Browse the options on the left, and find the tips that suit your surfing habits.

ClickSmart

Introduction

Search results, social media feeds and emails often contain bad links, which appear to lead to great content, but actually lead to malware. Last year, they were the route of 95% of all cybercrime*. So get ClickSmart – read our do’s and don'ts, and find out how to identify and avoid bad links.

Do's
Stop and think on social media.If you’re on social media, and someone shares the type of link you wouldn’t usually see from them, it could well be malicious.
Hover over the link with your mouse. When you do this, your browser will display the destination URL, usually in the bottom-left of your screen. If it doesn’t look right, don’t click.
Check for bad grammar or typos. If an email which claims to be from a trusted source is poorly written, or poorly spelt, it’s probably not from who it says it is.
Install comprehensive security software.If you do get caught out by a convincing link, the best security software will ask if you’re sure before continuing.
Don'ts
Download free software from little-known sites. It could well contain malware, so don’t download unless you trust the source.
Click on links before checking the sender’s email address. Email addresses can be a big giveaway – if it doesn’t look right, don’t click.
Follow links from an email that doesn’t use your name.Generic intros like ‘Hi user’ could well be the sign of a scam. If you’re their customer, they should know your name.
Be complacent. The threat of bad links applies to everyone – regardless of platform or device. So be wary, and always think before you click.

Get more click tips from Intel Security at www.intel.com/clicksmart

* Reference: http://venturebeat.com/2014/06/19/95-of-successful-security-attacks-are-the-result-of-human-error/

Email Protection

Introduction

From talking with friends to doing business, email plays a pivotal role in the way we communicate – which is partly why spam and phishing emails are so common. Read the email do’s and don'ts, and find out how to avoid being caught out.

Do's
Install comprehensive security software, and keep it up to date. Be sure that the security software you select protects you and your PC from viruses, worms, Trojans, spam, phishing scams, and other malicious software.
Be careful when opening attachments. You can obtain a virus, worm or Trojan simply by opening attachments – even if they’re from friends or family. If you do decide to open an attachment, make sure your security software is enabled first.
Be smart when using IM programs. If you use an IM program to communicate with friends and family, be careful when sending any personal information. Protect yourself by using a nickname for your IM screen name, and never accepting strangers into your IM groups.
Watch out for phishing scams.Phishing scams use fraudulent emails and fake websites, masquerading as legitimate businesses, to lure users into revealing private account or login information. Check that the website you’re visiting is legitimate in a separate browser before following email links.
Consider encrypting your emails.This will greatly increase the chances of personal or business-critical messages remaining private, even if they are accessed.
Don'ts
Share your email address with everyone. Only your family, friends and trusted business contacts should have your personal email address – so don’t post it anywhere public. This will help you avoid spam and phishing emails.
Give personal information via email. You might have great security software on your PC, but that doesn’t mean your friends and family do too. If their PC becomes compromised, and you’ve sent them personal information, your data could be at risk.
Reply to spam email. If you don’t recognise the sender, don’t respond. Even replying to spam mail to unsubscribe could set you up for more spam, as many spammers use the unsubscribe function just to verify your email address.
Enter your personal information into a pop-up. Sometimes a phisher will direct you to a real organisation’s website, but then an unauthorised pop-up created by the scammer will appear, with blanks in which to provide your personal information. If you fill it in, your data will go to the phisher.
Use an easy-to-guess password. Make it difficult for hackers to crack your password by incorporating capital letters, numbers, special characters – and using more than eleven characters.

Email Protection

Glossary
Encryption

Encryption is a security method of coding or scrambling data so that it can be decoded or read only by authorized users. This is commonly used to secure websites, online purchases, and other transactions.

Phishing

A form of criminal activity using social engineering techniques through email or instant messaging. Phishers attempt to fraudulently acquire other people's personal information, such as passwords and credit card details, by masquerading as a trustworthy person or business in an apparently official electronic communication. Typically, phishing emails request that recipients click on the link in the email to verify or update contact details or credit card information. Like spam, phishing emails are sent to a large number of email addresses, with the expectation that someone will act on the information in the email and disclose their personal information. Phishing can also happen via text messaging or phone.

Spam

An unwanted electronic message, most commonly unsolicited bulk email. Typically, spam is sent to multiple recipients who did not ask to receive it. Types include email spam, instant messaging spam, web search-engine spam, spam in blogs, and mobile phone-messaging spam. Spam includes legitimate advertisements, misleading advertisements, and phishing messages designed to trick recipients into giving up personal and financial information. Email messages are not considered spam if a user has signed up to receive them.

Trojan (Trojan horse)

Malicious programs disguised as legitimate software. Users are typically tricked into loading and executing it on their systems. One key factor that distinguishes a Trojan from viruses and worms is that Trojans don't replicate.

Virus

A computer program file capable of attaching to disks or other files and replicating itself repeatedly, typically without user knowledge or permission. Some viruses attach to files so when the infected file executes, the virus also executes. Other viruses sit in a computer's memory and infect files as the computer opens, modifies, or creates the files. Some viruses display symptoms, and others damage files and computer systems, but neither is essential in the definition of a virus.

Worm

A virus that spreads by creating duplicates of itself on other drives, systems, or networks. A mass-mailing worm is one that requires a user's intervention to spread, (e.g., opening an attachment or executing a downloaded file). Unlike viruses, worms do not infect other files. Most of today's email viruses are worms. A self-propagating worm does not require user intervention to spread.

Recommended Software

Introduction

Getting the right antivirus software is vital if you’re going to stay safe online. That’s why Toshiba recommends McAfee, our trusted security partner, to secure all your devices.

McAfee LiveSafe

Enrich your digital life by securing your data, your identity, and all your devices, with McAfee LiveSafe.

  • Protect against viruses and malware
  • Multiple device protection (PC’s, Macs, tablets and smartphone)
  • Guard against hackers and thieves
  • Block spam and dangerous email
Find out more
McAfee Family Protection

Built to allow children to develop their online interests, while protecting them as they learn and explore.

  • Block objectionable websites and inappropriate content
  • Manage the amount of time your children spend online
  • Monitor instant message conversations
Find out more

Internet Safety

Introduction

As our window to the internet, web browsers are central to the online experience. But with the number of malware threats continuing to rise, the sites we visit can put our security at risk. Check out our do’s and don’ts, and find out how to stay secure while browsing.

Do's
Be suspicious. If a search turns up a link to free content, or too-good-to-be-true offers, be wary. You can get malware just by visiting a site – compromising your computer and privacy.
Be extra cautious when searching hot topics. Fake and malicious sites are more prevalent on time-sensitive search results.
Check the web address. Cybercriminals often create very realistic sites that aim to collect your personal information. Look for misspellings or other clues that the link might be directing you to a phony website.
Set up bookmarks. Phishing sites sometimes rely on common misspellings to attract visitors. To lower your chances of inadvertently visiting them, create bookmarks for your favourite sites, so you don’t have to type the URL in.
Protect yourself. Use a comprehensive security package, with a safe search tool that identifies risky websites in search engine results.
Check that the site you’re visiting issecure. If a site is secure, it will say ‘https://’ at the start of the URL and your interactions with the web site are secured.
Don'ts
Browse without good protection. Without a comprehensive security package, you’re susceptible to malware and phishing attacks.
Visit disreputable websites. The more dubious the site, the more likely you are to be compromising your security.
Surf without an up-to-date web browser. Installing the latest patches for your web browser prevents cybercriminals exploiting known vulnerabilities.
Provide personal information to any unsolicited requests. Legitimate companies won’t ask for your details for no reason – so don’t feel obligated to provide them if asked.
Click without thinking. Phishing websites can be very convincing, so make sure you’re on the right site before submitting any personal information, or buying anything.

Internet Safety

Video

Internet Safety

Downloads and resources

Internet Safety

Glossary
Encryption

Encryption is a security method of coding or scrambling data so that it can be decoded or read only by authorized users. This is commonly used to secure websites, online purchases, and other transactions.

Malware

A generic term used to describe any type of software or code specifically designed to exploit a computer or the data it contains, without consent. Malware includes viruses, Trojan horses, spyware, adware, most rootkits, and other malicious programs.

Spam

An unwanted electronic message, most commonly unsolicited bulk email. Typically, spam is sent to multiple recipients who did not ask to receive it. Types include email spam, instant messaging spam, web search-engine spam, spam in blogs, and mobile phone-messaging spam. Spam includes legitimate advertisements, misleading advertisements, and phishing messages designed to trick recipients into giving up personal and financial information. Email messages are not considered spam if a user has signed up to receive them.

Spyware

Spyware spies on a user's computer. Spyware can capture information like web browsing habits, email messages, usernames and passwords, and credit card information. Just like viruses, spyware can be installed on a computer through an email attachment containing malicious software.

Virus

A computer program file capable of attaching to disks or other files and replicating itself repeatedly, typically without user knowledge or permission. Some viruses attach to files so when the infected file executes, the virus also executes. Other viruses sit in a computer's memory and infect files as the computer opens, modifies, or creates the files. Some viruses display symptoms, and others damage files and computer systems, but neither is essential in the definition of a virus.

Recommended Software

Introduction

Getting the right antivirus software is vital if you’re going to stay safe online. That’s why Toshiba recommends McAfee, our trusted security partner, to secure all your devices.

McAfee LiveSafe

Enrich your digital life by securing your data, your identity, and all your devices, with McAfee LiveSafe.

  • Protect against viruses and malware
  • Multiple device protection (PC’s, Macs, tablets and smartphone)
  • Guard against hackers and thieves
  • Block spam and dangerous email
Find out more
McAfee Family Protection

Built to allow children to develop their online interests, while protecting them as they learn and explore.

  • Block objectionable websites and inappropriate content
  • Manage the amount of time your children spend online
  • Monitor instant message conversations
Find out more

Mobile Security

Introduction

Now that almost everyone owns a smartphone or a tablet, we’ve never been more capable on the move. Mobile devices are now powerful computers in the palms of our hands – and they should be protected appropriately. Find out how to keep your mobile data secure with these easy-to-remember do’s and don’ts.

Do's
Read up before you download. Malicious apps can install malware that shares your personal details with criminals, or programmes your phone to call premium phone lines. Read the relevant comments and reviews, and check the developer’s website before downloading any app.
Check app permissions before accepting and downloading. Many apps ask for unnecessary permissions that give access to your contacts, calendar, location and even the device’s unique ID (IMEI).
Lock your device. Protecting your phone or tablet with a pin access code will prevent anyone from viewing sensitive data should it be lost or stolen. Avoid using ‘1234’, your date of birth, or anything else that’s easy to guess.
Install comprehensive mobile or cross-device security software. Good security software will protect you against a wide range of different attacks.
Log out of shopping sites. Leaving yourself signed in could make you vulnerable to attackers should you lose your phone.
Keep your operating system updated. Old operating systems often have weaknesses that can be exploited by scammers.
Back up your data. Just like with a normal PC, it’s important to keep your data backed up in case you lose it.
Don'ts
Keep Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and location services (GPS) connected when you’re not using them. Leaving your phone connected gives hackers an easy route to your personal data.
Access sensitive information in a public area. You never know who’s looking over your shoulder – and it only takes a second to see and steal vital information.
Text or email personal information carelessly. Doing so leaves you exposed if either you or the recipient has their phone hacked, lost or stolen.
Hack or ‘jailbreak’ your device. This can significantly weaken its security, making you less protected than you should be.
Clicks on links or attachments in unsolicited emails. These links could lead you to malicious sites that infect your computer with malware.

Mobile Security

Glossary
Hacker

A broad term for a person who uses programming skills and technical knowledge to create and modify computer software and hardware by finding weaknesses and exploiting them, including computer programming, administration, and security-related items. Hackers can be motivated by a number of reasons both positive and negative, such as profit, protest, or challenge. Criminal hackers create malware in order to commit crimes.

In the early days of computing, hacker was a term used to describe a programmer who had a curiosity and appreciation of programs and systems and how they worked. Over time, however, the term gained a negative connotation and began to refer to someone who uses the knowledge to break into other people's systems to steal information and cause havoc. We also call programmers who use their skills for harm "crackers."

Recommended Software

Introduction

Getting the right antivirus software is vital if you’re going to stay safe online. That’s why Toshiba recommends McAfee, our trusted security partner, to secure all your devices.

McAfee LiveSafe

Enrich your digital life by securing your data, your identity, and all your devices, with McAfee LiveSafe.

  • Protect against viruses and malware
  • Multiple device protection (PC’s, Macs, tablets and smartphone)
  • Guard against hackers and thieves
  • Block spam and dangerous email
Find out more
McAfee Family Protection

Built to allow children to develop their online interests, while protecting them as they learn and explore.

  • Block objectionable websites and inappropriate content
  • Manage the amount of time your children spend online
  • Monitor instant message conversations
Find out more

Identity Theft Protection

Introduction

Identity theft is one of the world’s fastest growing crimes – and it could cost you both your finances, and your reputation. So what steps can you take to lower the risk of being defrauded? Find out with our comprehensive do’s and don’ts guide.

Do's
Monitor your credit reports and be aware. At least once a year, check your credit history. This will tell you if someone is using your personal finance information without your knowledge.
Watch out for phishing scams. Legitimate businesses will never ask you to update your personal information via email. Always verify web addresses before submitting your personal information.
Use a secure internet connection. Protect your router and Wi-Fi access with a password. Hackers can easily retrieve sensitive data that is sent over an unsecured internet connection.
Always access the Internet from behind a firewall. A firewall adds a security layer between your PC and the Internet, and helps stop hackers from stealing your identity.
Invest in trusted, all-inclusive security software. Look for comprehensive security software that protects you from viruses, spyware, adware, hackers, and phishing scams.
Don'ts
Download free software from obscure sources. Free software from disreputable sources often includes spyware, which can allow criminals to monitor your keystrokes, track your Internet logins, transmit confidential information, or redirect your browser to fake sites.
Provide personal details online. This sounds obvious, but thousands of people do this every day on social media. Avoid publishing identifying information like your address, or your date and year of birth.
Store financial information on your laptop. If you’re infected by spyware, or you lose your laptop, your banking details could easily get into the wrong hands.
Give your kids unmonitored access online. Make your children aware of the risks of sharing personal details online, as they are particularly vulnerable to illegitimate requests for information.
Download attachments without thinking. Do not download files attached to emails – even if they’re from friends and family – unless you know its content to be secure.
Provide banking details online. Your bank will never ask you to provide your banking details– so if you’re asked, assume the communication to be a phishing scam.

Identity Theft Protection

Glossary
Adware

Software that automatically plays, displays, or downloads advertisements to a computer, often in exchange for the right to use a program without paying for it. The advertisements seen are based on monitoring of browser habits. Most adware is safe to use, but some can serve as spyware, gathering information about you from your hard drive, the websites you visit, or even your keystrokes. Certain types of adware have the capability to capture or transmit personal information.

Firewall

A piece of hardware or software that is designed to block unauthorized access while permitting authorized communications. It is configured to permit or deny network transmissions based upon a set of rules. They are designed to protect the network's resources from users on other networks.

Hacker

A broad term for a person who uses programming skills and technical knowledge to create and modify computer software and hardware by finding weaknesses and exploiting them, including computer programming, administration, and security-related items. Hackers can be motivated by a number of reasons both positive and negative, such as profit, protest, or challenge. Criminal hackers create malware in order to commit crimes.

In the early days of computing, hacker was a term used to describe a programmer who had a curiosity and appreciation of programs and systems and how they worked. Over time, however, the term gained a negative connotation and began to refer to someone who uses the knowledge to break into other people's systems to steal information and cause havoc. We also call programmers who use their skills for harm "crackers."

Phishing

A form of criminal activity using social engineering techniques through email or instant messaging. Phishers attempt to fraudulently acquire other people's personal information, such as passwords and credit card details, by masquerading as a trustworthy person or business in an apparently official electronic communication. Typically, phishing emails request that recipients click on the link in the email to verify or update contact details or credit card information. Like spam, phishing emails are sent to a large number of email addresses, with the expectation that someone will act on the information in the email and disclose their personal information. Phishing can also happen via text messaging or phone.

Spyware

Spyware spies on a user's computer. Spyware can capture information like web browsing habits, email messages, usernames and passwords, and credit card information. Just like viruses, spyware can be installed on a computer through an email attachment containing malicious software.

Virus

A computer program file capable of attaching to disks or other files and replicating itself repeatedly, typically without user knowledge or permission. Some viruses attach to files so when the infected file executes, the virus also executes. Other viruses sit in a computer's memory and infect files as the computer opens, modifies, or creates the files. Some viruses display symptoms, and others damage files and computer systems, but neither is essential in the definition of a virus.

Recommended Software

Introduction

Getting the right antivirus software is vital if you’re going to stay safe online. That’s why Toshiba recommends McAfee, our trusted security partner, to secure all your devices.

McAfee LiveSafe

Enrich your digital life by securing your data, your identity, and all your devices, with McAfee LiveSafe.

  • Protect against viruses and malware
  • Multiple device protection (PC’s, Macs, tablets and smartphone)
  • Guard against hackers and thieves
  • Block spam and dangerous email
Find out more
McAfee Family Protection

Built to allow children to develop their online interests, while protecting them as they learn and explore.

  • Block objectionable websites and inappropriate content
  • Manage the amount of time your children spend online
  • Monitor instant message conversations
Find out more

Family Safety

Introduction

Technology has revolutionised education, entertainment and communication for the whole family – and chances are, your tech-savvy kids know just how to make the most of it. But just like in the real world, they still need protection and guidance. Here’s a set of do’s and don’ts for online family safety.

Do's
Set up parental controls on every family computer. This will enable you to take the steps necessary for family internet safety.
Set up instant alerts. Set up notifications that let you know when your children attempt to access certain content or post private information.
Utilise web blocking. Prevent access to inappropriate content with web blocking tools.
Set time limits. Manage your kids’ screen time to ensure they don’t get into poor online habits.
Monitor usage. Gain an overview of your kids’ internet use. This will allow you to educate them on correct online behaviour.
Place computers in a main living area. If your children are in an open area, it will discourage them from accessing inappropriate content.
Don'ts
Let social media go unmonitored. Kids are known to overshare online, so monitor postings to ensure that private information isn’t being broadcast. Check for websites that provide parents with an up-to-date list of the most popular childrens’ social networks.
Permit peer-to-peer file sharing programs. When using file-sharing programs, it’s difficult to verify that the source of the files is trustworthy. Regulate their use to prevent receiving viruses, and Trojan horses.
Let instant messaging go unchecked. Monitor chats and detect use of improper dialogue, bullying, or being threatened by strangers, so you can react as early as possible.
Allow emails to go unmonitored. Email blocking can stop strangers from being able to communicate with your children.

Family Safety

Glossary
Trojan

Malicious programs disguised as legitimate software. Users are typically tricked into loading and executing it on their systems. One key factor that distinguishes a Trojan from viruses and worms is that Trojans don't replicate.

Virus

A computer program file capable of attaching to disks or other files and replicating itself repeatedly, typically without user knowledge or permission. Some viruses attach to files so when the infected file executes, the virus also executes. Other viruses sit in a computer's memory and infect files as the computer opens, modifies, or creates the files. Some viruses display symptoms, and others damage files and computer systems, but neither is essential in the definition of a virus.

Recommended Software

Introduction

Getting the right antivirus software is vital if you’re going to stay safe online. That’s why Toshiba recommends McAfee, our trusted security partner, to secure all your devices.

McAfee LiveSafe

Enrich your digital life by securing your data, your identity, and all your devices, with McAfee LiveSafe.

  • Protect against viruses and malware
  • Multiple device protection (PC’s, Macs, tablets and smartphone)
  • Guard against hackers and thieves
  • Block spam and dangerous email
Find out more
McAfee Family Protection

Built to allow children to develop their online interests, while protecting them as they learn and explore.

  • Block objectionable websites and inappropriate content
  • Manage the amount of time your children spend online
  • Monitor instant message conversations
Find out more

Online Shopping

Introduction

The internet has transformed the way we shop – vastly increasing our range of choice, while taking away the hassle of actually going anywhere. But with this online shopping revolution, there comes increased risk of fraud. Read our do’s and don’ts, for a safer online shopping experience.

Do's
Buy from encrypted websites. This reduces your risk of being defrauded. You can tell if a site is encrypted by its address – if it has ‘https://’ at the start of the URL, and you can see a locked padlock symbol to the left of the address bar, the site is secure.
Pay by credit card or an online payment service. Most credit cards offer protection against identity theft, so if someone else uses your credit card, you won’t be liable to pay for it when your bill comes. Online payment services like Paypal also offer some protection.
Buy from sources you trust. Ideally, it’s best to stick to well-known sites. But if you need to buy from somewhere for the first time, do your research first – beginning with contacting customer services via email or telephone.
Check your credit card statements. Make sure you’ve been charged the correct amount, and that no extra charges appear on your bill. Keep copies of sales transactions for future reference in case a dispute arises.
Check the site’s privacy policies before you order. It’s also a good idea to check out a few reviews, as they can be insightful about the site’s efficiency and security.
Don'ts
Reply to unsolicited emails. If you get an email from a company you don’t know, inviting you to buy something of high value for a low price, be cautious. Most spammers are looking to make some easy money, or obtain your bank details.
Buy without using comprehensive computer security software. Make sure you’ve installed a comprehensive and up-to-date security software package. This will protect you against viruses, malware, spyware and identity theft.
Pay by debit card or cash. With these methods, the money is taken directly out of your account, making it difficult to get it back. Paying with credit cards makes it much easier to dispute fraudulent charges.
Buy from a website if you don’t completely trust it. Trust your instincts. If you sense that something is not quite right about the website from which you want to make a purchase, abort the process immediately.

Online Shopping

Video

Online Shopping

Downloads and resources

Online Shopping

Glossary
Encryption

Encryption is a security method of coding or scrambling data so that it can be decoded or read only by authorized users. This is commonly used to secure websites, online purchases, and other transactions.

Malware

A generic term used to describe any type of software or code specifically designed to exploit a computer or the data it contains, without consent. Malware includes viruses, Trojan horses, spyware, adware, most rootkits, and other malicious programs.

Spam

An unwanted electronic message, most commonly unsolicited bulk email. Typically, spam is sent to multiple recipients who did not ask to receive it. Types include email spam, instant messaging spam, web search-engine spam, spam in blogs, and mobile phone-messaging spam. Spam includes legitimate advertisements, misleading advertisements, and phishing messages designed to trick recipients into giving up personal and financial information. Email messages are not considered spam if a user has signed up to receive them.

Spyware

Spyware spies on a user's computer. Spyware can capture information like web browsing habits, email messages, usernames and passwords, and credit card information. Just like viruses, spyware can be installed on a computer through an email attachment containing malicious software.

Virus

A computer program file capable of attaching to disks or other files and replicating itself repeatedly, typically without user knowledge or permission. Some viruses attach to files so when the infected file executes, the virus also executes. Other viruses sit in a computer's memory and infect files as the computer opens, modifies, or creates the files. Some viruses display symptoms, and others damage files and computer systems, but neither is essential in the definition of a virus.

Recommended Software

Introduction

Getting the right antivirus software is vital if you’re going to stay safe online. That’s why Toshiba recommends McAfee, our trusted security partner, to secure all your devices.

McAfee LiveSafe

Enrich your digital life by securing your data, your identity, and all your devices, with McAfee LiveSafe.

  • Protect against viruses and malware
  • Multiple device protection (PC’s, Macs, tablets and smartphone)
  • Guard against hackers and thieves
  • Block spam and dangerous email
Find out more
McAfee Family Protection

Built to allow children to develop their online interests, while protecting them as they learn and explore.

  • Block objectionable websites and inappropriate content
  • Manage the amount of time your children spend online
  • Monitor instant message conversations
Find out more

Social media

Introduction

Social networks can be a great way of keeping up with friends. But the wrong settings could mean sharing the details of your personal life with complete strangers. Here are some things to be aware of when you’re being an online socialite.

Do's
Be selective when adding ‘friends’. Make sure you know, trust and have met the other person before accepting them. Adding profiles you don’t recognise can open you up to identity theft, or other unwanted attention.
Only select apps from trusted sources. Many apps access and use your personal details and friend lists, so be cautious. For PCs, as well as mobile devices, bad apps can be just as damaging as bad software.
Know your privacy settings, and review them regularly. Adjust your settings so that only your friends can see your updates. Most social networks allow you to give selected rights to groups of people, so you can ensure you’re not sharing anything inappropriate with, say, work colleagues.
Think before you click. The latest scams don’t require app installation or reposting to infect your PC or mobile device with malware. Content itself can be malicious, so make the sure videos and articles on your newsfeed are from a trusted source before you click.
Only use fully protected devices. Security software will detect attacks as they come, so make sure you’re protected before you start mingling.
Get a strong password, and change it regularly. Use at least eleven characters, with a mix of upper and lower-case letters, numbers and symbols. The longer the password, the harder it is to crack.
Don'ts
Upload personal or inappropriate pictures. Pictures say a thousand words. And online, they can travel fast. Stop and think before you upload images.
Say anything you wouldn’t say in real life. Be aware that your colleagues or school could have access to your posts. Plus, the things you put online are there forever, so don’t say anything that might reflect badly on you in the future.
Give apps additional permissions before verifying them. Lots of apps will automatically spam your friends’ walls – and some collect personal data and sell it on to anyone they like.
Publish any identifying information. This includes your address, phone number, birthday, and your location. Remember, your profile picture is visible to everyone, so make sure it’s professional or neutral.
Mix wall posts and personal messages. Sensitive information or detailed conversations shouldn’t be made public. Make sure you’re not sharing more than you realise.

Social media

Video

Social media

Downloads and resources

Social media

Glossary
Malware

A generic term used to describe any type of software or code specifically designed to exploit a computer or the data it contains, without consent. Malware includes viruses, Trojan horses, spyware, adware, most rootkits, and other malicious programs.

Spam

An unwanted electronic message, most commonly unsolicited bulk email. Typically, spam is sent to multiple recipients who did not ask to receive it. Types include email spam, instant messaging spam, web search-engine spam, spam in blogs, and mobile phone-messaging spam. Spam includes legitimate advertisements, misleading advertisements, and phishing messages designed to trick recipients into giving up personal and financial information. Email messages are not considered spam if a user has signed up to receive them.

Tablet

A portable computer that uses a touchscreen as its primary input device. Most tablets are small and weigh less than the average laptop.

Recommended Software

Introduction

Getting the right antivirus software is vital if you’re going to stay safe online. That’s why Toshiba recommends McAfee, our trusted security partner, to secure all your devices.

McAfee LiveSafe

Enrich your digital life by securing your data, your identity, and all your devices, with McAfee LiveSafe.

  • Protect against viruses and malware
  • Multiple device protection (PC’s, Macs, tablets and smartphone)
  • Guard against hackers and thieves
  • Block spam and dangerous email
Find out more
McAfee Family Protection

Built to allow children to develop their online interests, while protecting them as they learn and explore.

  • Block objectionable websites and inappropriate content
  • Manage the amount of time your children spend online
  • Monitor instant message conversations
Find out more

Small Business Protection

Introduction

Life in a small or medium-sized business can move quickly. And in the absence of large IT budgets, security doesn’t always get the attention it deserves – leaving critical information at risk. Follow these simple do’s and don’ts to ensure that your company isn’t exposed.

Do's
Keep software updated. Patches often strengthen security in applications and programmes. Keep software updated to avoid being caught out by known vulnerabilities.
Use comprehensive, up-to-date security suite. Installing comprehensive antivirus, email and firewall software as minimum and keeping it updated will significantly reduce security risks.
Educate your employees. Make sure staff are trained to never open unknown attachments in email or click on unverified links.
Limit access to financial data. Minimise the number of people who have access to sensitive financial or personal content. The fewer the number of people who have log-in credentials, the harder it is to hack in.
Employ stringent password policies. For workers within a small business with access to financial or personal data, be sure to use different passwords to access these accounts than are used for more general login purposes.
Don'ts
Download unverified apps. Be alert when buying and installing applications from online app stores, as they can harbour malware.
Choose a ‘one size fits all’ security solution. IT capabilities and resources vary widely among small to mid-sized business. Make sure your security suits your PC fleet – taking care to consider any mobile devices you may have.
Click before you think on social media. Sites like Facebook can be important marketing channels for SMBs – but be cautious. Accessing links and apps from unverified sources can put your security at risk.
Let security take care of itself. With so much going on, SMB security doesn’t always get the attention it requires. But if you don’t take action, business-critical data could be at risk.

Small Business Protection

Glossary
Firewall

A piece of hardware or software that is designed to block unauthorized access while permitting authorized communications. It is configured to permit or deny network transmissions based upon a set of rules. They are designed to protect the network's resources from users on other networks.

Hacker

A broad term for a person who uses programming skills and technical knowledge to create and modify computer software and hardware by finding weaknesses and exploiting them, including computer programming, administration, and security-related items. Hackers can be motivated by a number of reasons both positive and negative, such as profit, protest, or challenge. Criminal hackers create malware in order to commit crimes.

Malware

A generic term used to describe any type of software or code specifically designed to exploit a computer or the data it contains, without consent. Malware includes viruses, Trojan horses, spyware, adware, most rootkits, and other malicious programs.

Virus

A computer program file capable of attaching to disks or other files and replicating itself repeatedly, typically without user knowledge or permission. Some viruses attach to files so when the infected file executes, the virus also executes. Other viruses sit in a computer's memory and infect files as the computer opens, modifies, or creates the files. Some viruses display symptoms, and others damage files and computer systems, but neither is essential in the definition of a virus.

Recommended Software

Introduction

Getting the right antivirus software is vital if you’re going to stay safe online. That’s why Toshiba recommends McAfee, our trusted security partner, to secure all your devices.

McAfee LiveSafe

Enrich your digital life by securing your data, your identity, and all your devices, with McAfee LiveSafe.

  • Protect against viruses and malware
  • Multiple device protection (PC’s, Macs, tablets and smartphone)
  • Guard against hackers and thieves
  • Block spam and dangerous email
Find out more

Recommended Software

Introduction

Getting the right antivirus software is vital if you’re going to stay safe online. That’s why Toshiba recommends McAfee, our trusted security partner, to secure all your devices.

McAfee LiveSafe

Enrich your digital life by securing your data, your identity, and all your devices, with McAfee LiveSafe.

  • Protect against viruses and malware
  • Multiple device protection (PC’s, Macs, tablets and smartphone)
  • Guard against hackers and thieves
  • Block spam and dangerous email
Find out more
McAfee Family Protection

Built to allow children to develop their online interests, while protecting them as they learn and explore.

  • Block objectionable websites and inappropriate content
  • Manage the amount of time your children spend online
  • Monitor instant message conversations
Find out more